(Source: kitschyliving)

frenchtwist:

via mudwerks:

(via and everything else too: What a “VAMPIRE” Really Looks Like…)
Maila Nurmi
Most books on witchcraft will tell you that witches work naked. This is because most books on witchcraft were written by men. ~ Neil Gaiman Photography by Albert-Joseph Pénot, 1890
Most books on witchcraft will tell you that witches work naked. This is because most books on witchcraft were written by men.
~ Neil Gaiman

Photography by Albert-Joseph Pénot, 1890
The House on Haunted Hill

The House on Haunted Hill

(via horrorpunk)

theloudestvoice:

Lobby card for The House with the Golden Windows, 1916
(link)

theloudestvoice:

Lobby card for The House with the Golden Windows, 1916

(link)

(via zulabelle-deactivated20120510)

vintagegal:

Pin-up Witch 1955

This is one awkward pin-up.

vintagegal:

Pin-up Witch 1955

This is one awkward pin-up.

(via vintagehalloweentreats)

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Thursday, 6th October
hoodoothatvoodoo:

Breezy Magazine
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Friday, 7th October
Vintage (and vaguely racist) board game found in a closet of my mother’s house.

Vintage (and vaguely racist) board game found in a closet of my mother’s house.

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Friday, 9th December
burnedshoes:

© Ken Russell, 1955, Teddy Girls
14-year-old Jean Rayner in the exploratory stage of Teddyism. The following images are from Ken Russell’s January 1955 series ‘The Last of the Teddy Girls’.
Long before Ken Russell, who passed away in late November, became the notorious film director responsible for Women in Love, The Devils, The Boyfriend and The Who’s rock opera Tommy, he was an art student and, later, a freelance photographer.In 1955, the fledgling photographer created a series called The Last of the Teddy Girls, which featured photographs taken against the war-torn backdrop of London’s East End. The images are one of the first reportage series to be made of British youth culture, presenting pictures of working class girls in Neo-Edwardian dress—a fascinating counterpoint to their drape-coated and drainpipe-wearing male counterparts the Teddy Boy. The Last of the Teddy Girls also provided a rare and unique glimpse of a little recognized and under-documented subculture of austere post war Britain.
(read more / see more photos)

burnedshoes:

© Ken Russell, 1955, Teddy Girls

14-year-old Jean Rayner in the exploratory stage of Teddyism. The following images are from Ken Russell’s January 1955 series ‘The Last of the Teddy Girls’.

Long before Ken Russell, who passed away in late November, became the notorious film director responsible for Women in Love, The Devils, The Boyfriend and The Who’s rock opera Tommy, he was an art student and, later, a freelance photographer.
In 1955, the fledgling photographer created a series called The Last of the Teddy Girls, which featured photographs taken against the war-torn backdrop of London’s East End. The images are one of the first reportage series to be made of British youth culture, presenting pictures of working class girls in Neo-Edwardian dress—a fascinating counterpoint to their drape-coated and drainpipe-wearing male counterparts the Teddy Boy. The Last of the Teddy Girls also provided a rare and unique glimpse of a little recognized and under-documented subculture of austere post war Britain.

(read more / see more photos)

(Source: burnedshoes, via darksilenceinsuburbia)

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Modelling for a Gil Elvgren drawing

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Modelling for a Gil Elvgren drawing

(via wickedknickers)

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Saturday, 3rd March