ghoulnextdoor:

FEARFUL SITUATION OF A FEMALE SOMNAMBULIST IN SOMERSETSHIRE |The Illustrated Police News Saturday 1 June 1867
The large illustration in our  front page is a correct representation of the perilous position of a  young girl, as seen by two spectators, on Friday last. The circumstances  are thus described in a local journal:—
“On Friday night, the 24th inst., a harrowing scene occurred at a small village near Glastonbury.  It appears that a young girl, aged seventeen, named Clara Dalrymple—who  has been in the habit of walking in her sleep on very many  occasions—rose from her bed on the night in question and opened the  window of her bedroom, which was on the fourth storey of the house, and  stepped on to a plank that ran across from her father’s residence to one  opposite. Some workmen had been repairing the latter, and—to facilitate  these operations—had neglected to remove the plank which had been  improvised as a communication between the two dwellings. Miss Dalrymple,  to the horror of two persons who had witnessed her proceedings in the  narrow passage below, stepped on this plank which gave way before she  had reached its centre, and the unfortunate girl was precipitated into  the court yard beneath—falling from a height of seventy feet. In her  descent her dress caught the arm of a lamp-post in the passage, thus  breaking her fall, and was the means of saving her life. A man, named  James Grimsby, a servant of her father’s, and Mr. W. Styant, a tradesman  in the village, were the sole witnesses of the accident. When the first  shock was over they hastened to her assistance, being at the time under  the full impression that she was dead. Such, however, proved not to be  the case. Beyond a few bruises Miss Dalrymple was in no way injured;  for, in less than half an hour after the accident, she was conversing  with her parents upon her miraculous escape.”

ghoulnextdoor:

FEARFUL SITUATION OF A FEMALE SOMNAMBULIST IN SOMERSETSHIRE |The Illustrated Police News Saturday 1 June 1867

The large illustration in our front page is a correct representation of the perilous position of a young girl, as seen by two spectators, on Friday last. The circumstances are thus described in a local journal:—

“On Friday night, the 24th inst., a harrowing scene occurred at a small village near Glastonbury. It appears that a young girl, aged seventeen, named Clara Dalrymple—who has been in the habit of walking in her sleep on very many occasions—rose from her bed on the night in question and opened the window of her bedroom, which was on the fourth storey of the house, and stepped on to a plank that ran across from her father’s residence to one opposite. Some workmen had been repairing the latter, and—to facilitate these operations—had neglected to remove the plank which had been improvised as a communication between the two dwellings. Miss Dalrymple, to the horror of two persons who had witnessed her proceedings in the narrow passage below, stepped on this plank which gave way before she had reached its centre, and the unfortunate girl was precipitated into the court yard beneath—falling from a height of seventy feet. In her descent her dress caught the arm of a lamp-post in the passage, thus breaking her fall, and was the means of saving her life. A man, named James Grimsby, a servant of her father’s, and Mr. W. Styant, a tradesman in the village, were the sole witnesses of the accident. When the first shock was over they hastened to her assistance, being at the time under the full impression that she was dead. Such, however, proved not to be the case. Beyond a few bruises Miss Dalrymple was in no way injured; for, in less than half an hour after the accident, she was conversing with her parents upon her miraculous escape.”

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Monday, 6th June
treselegant:

Illustrated Police News 1896.

That octopus looks suspiciously like E.T.

treselegant:

Illustrated Police News 1896.

That octopus looks suspiciously like E.T.

(via )

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Thursday, 16th June

Attenborough skull mystery finally solved

Attenborough skull mystery finally solved

It was one of the most gruesome murder puzzles in British history that stumped detectives for over 130 years.

But the riddle over the infamous slaying of Julia Martha Thomas in 1879 has finally been solved, six months after a battered skull was unearthed in David Attenborough’s back garden in Richmond, south west London.

via Dailykvetch

mydaguerreotypeboyfriend:

Boniface Berkmyer, train lineman, not holding a whip. (Relative of the submitter, who clearly has a handsome family.)
Submitted by Shannon

mydaguerreotypeboyfriend:

Boniface Berkmyer, train lineman, not holding a whip. (Relative of the submitter, who clearly has a handsome family.)

Submitted by Shannon

(via )

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Thursday, 14th July
Lillie Langtree as Lady Macbeth.

Lillie Langtree as Lady Macbeth.

The Chevalier Tannhauser, having lighted off his horse, stood dutifully for a moment beneath the ombre gateway of the mysterious Hill, troubled with an exquisite fear lest a day’s travel should have too cruelly undone the laboured niceness of his dress. His hand, slim and gracious as La Marquise du Deffand’s in the drawing by Carmontelle, played nervously about the gold hair that fell upon his shoulders like a finely-curled peruke, and from point to point of a precise toilet the fingers wandered, quelling the little mutinies of cravat and ruffle.
Aubrey Beardsley, Under the Hill
As the tray was being carried away, the capricious Florizel snatched as usual a slipper from it, and fitted the foot over his penis, and made the necessary movements. That was Florizel’s little caprice.
Aubrey Beardsley, Under the Hill
It would pain me horribly to tell you about the painting of her face; suffice it that the sorrowful work was accomplished; frankly, magnificently, and without a shadow of deception.
Aubrey Beardsley, Under the Hill
Yes, he was a bawdy creature, and his workshop a regular brothel. However, his great talent stood in no need of such meretricious and phallic support, and he was every whit as strong and facile with his brush as with his tool.
Aubrey Beardsley, Under the Hill
'Twas not long before the invaders began to enjoy the first fruits of their expedition, plucking them in the most seductive manner with their smooth fingers, and feasting lip and tongue and tooth, whilst the shepherds and satyrs and shepherdesses fairly gasped under the new joys, for the pleasure they experienced was almost too keen for their simple and untilled natures.
Aubrey Beardsley, Under the Hill