ateliertovar:

trubeverage:

niteflight: Isabella Rossellini in Death Becomes Her (1992)

when I first realized I like girls (first seen circa age eight.)

ateliertovar:

trubeverage:

niteflight: Isabella Rossellini in Death Becomes Her (1992)

when I first realized I like girls (first seen circa age eight.)

goodnightday:

Helena Bonham Carter 

goodnightday:

Helena Bonham Carter 

m3zzaluna:

gypsy children playing violin in street, budapest, hungary, 1939
photo by n.r. farbman

m3zzaluna:

gypsy children playing violin in street, budapest, hungary, 1939

photo by n.r. farbman

(Source: m3zzaluna, via planchette)

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Thursday, 18th August
burnedshoes:

© Ken Russell, 1955, Teddy Girls
14-year-old Jean Rayner in the exploratory stage of Teddyism. The following images are from Ken Russell’s January 1955 series ‘The Last of the Teddy Girls’.
Long before Ken Russell, who passed away in late November, became the notorious film director responsible for Women in Love, The Devils, The Boyfriend and The Who’s rock opera Tommy, he was an art student and, later, a freelance photographer.In 1955, the fledgling photographer created a series called The Last of the Teddy Girls, which featured photographs taken against the war-torn backdrop of London’s East End. The images are one of the first reportage series to be made of British youth culture, presenting pictures of working class girls in Neo-Edwardian dress—a fascinating counterpoint to their drape-coated and drainpipe-wearing male counterparts the Teddy Boy. The Last of the Teddy Girls also provided a rare and unique glimpse of a little recognized and under-documented subculture of austere post war Britain.
(read more / see more photos)

burnedshoes:

© Ken Russell, 1955, Teddy Girls

14-year-old Jean Rayner in the exploratory stage of Teddyism. The following images are from Ken Russell’s January 1955 series ‘The Last of the Teddy Girls’.

Long before Ken Russell, who passed away in late November, became the notorious film director responsible for Women in Love, The Devils, The Boyfriend and The Who’s rock opera Tommy, he was an art student and, later, a freelance photographer.
In 1955, the fledgling photographer created a series called The Last of the Teddy Girls, which featured photographs taken against the war-torn backdrop of London’s East End. The images are one of the first reportage series to be made of British youth culture, presenting pictures of working class girls in Neo-Edwardian dress—a fascinating counterpoint to their drape-coated and drainpipe-wearing male counterparts the Teddy Boy. The Last of the Teddy Girls also provided a rare and unique glimpse of a little recognized and under-documented subculture of austere post war Britain.

(read more / see more photos)

(Source: burnedshoes, via darksilenceinsuburbia)

laurajwryan:

Night Haze, 10/20/2006, pencil drawing in sketchbook, 10 x 8 inches

laurajwryan:

Night Haze, 10/20/2006, pencil drawing in sketchbook, 10 x 8 inches

(via ekkolalia)

liquidnight:

Richard A. Kirk
Interior illustration from The Lost Machine

liquidnight:

Richard A. Kirk

Interior illustration from The Lost Machine

frenchtwist:

via mrgolightly:

31 Horror Movies in 31 Days - Day 21Eyes Without A Face (1960)dir. Georges FranjuA brilliant surgeon, Dr. Génessier, helped by his assistant Louise, kidnaps nice young women. He removes their faces and tries to graft them onto the head of his beloved daughter Christiane, whose face has been entirely spoiled in a car crash. All the experiments fail, and the victims die, but Génessier keeps trying. (via)My Rating: 10/10

frenchtwist:

via mrgolightly:

31 Horror Movies in 31 Days - Day 21
Eyes Without A Face (1960)
dir. Georges Franju

A brilliant surgeon, Dr. Génessier, helped by his assistant Louise, kidnaps nice young women. He removes their faces and tries to graft them onto the head of his beloved daughter Christiane, whose face has been entirely spoiled in a car crash. All the experiments fail, and the victims die, but Génessier keeps trying. (via)

My Rating: 10/10

antitacta:

Edvard Munch, Red and Black, 1888.

antitacta:

Edvard Munch, Red and Black, 1888.

(via ekkolalia)

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Sunday, 7th April