Whenever you have your photograph taken with a large group, you lose track of the others one by one, whether to death or to life.
Izumi Kyoka, “The Heartvine”
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Monday, 20th October
what-the-hell-is-steampunk:

source
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Monday, 20th October

Some of Edward Gorey's illustrations.

(Source: bookporn, via strangeviolin)

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Sunday, 19th October
Tsujimachi embraced the moss-covered gravestone with one hand. No, wait. Better not to say embraced. Rather, he had placed a hand upon what we might call the young woman’s stone corpse, even though it was colder than frost.
Izumi Kyoka, “The Heartvine”
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Sunday, 19th October
centuriespast:

Aubrey BeardsleyEnglish, 1872 - 1898
The Peacock Skirt, #5, 1894
Woodcut on Japanese vellum, 9 x 6.4375
Bell Gallery

centuriespast:

Aubrey Beardsley
English, 1872 - 1898
The Peacock Skirt, #5, 1894
Woodcut on Japanese vellum, 9 x 6.4375
Bell Gallery

(via demoniality)

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Sunday, 19th October
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Sunday, 19th October
oldoils:

The Night-Hag Visiting Lapland Witches Oil on canvas (detail) - 1796 Henry Fuseli (Swiss, Zürich 1741–1825 London)

oldoils:

The Night-Hag Visiting Lapland Witches
Oil on canvas (detail) - 1796
Henry Fuseli (Swiss, Zürich 1741–1825 London)

(via demoniality)

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Sunday, 19th October
femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
While still recognizably his aesthetic, After the Duel marks a nearly complete departure from Antonio Mancini's usual mode.
Instead of a nuanced image of poverty, the 1872 painting focuses on a heightened, theatrical moment in the life of a wealthy child.
A white shirt smeared with bloody hand-prints drapes over a chair, a sword cutting across the composition from beneath it.
Meanwhile, the shadow of a man leans towards the frightened subject as the latter averts his gaze.
The narrative isn’t perfectly clear. Perhaps the unseen man is the child’s father, injured in the titular duel? Perhaps, instead, he’s some third party, come to explain the fatal result to a now fatherless son?
In any case, the result is a strikingly cinematic painting that would find itself perfectly at home on the cover of a Dashiell Hammett novel.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

While still recognizably his aesthetic, After the Duel marks a nearly complete departure from Antonio Mancini's usual mode.

Instead of a nuanced image of poverty, the 1872 painting focuses on a heightened, theatrical moment in the life of a wealthy child.

A white shirt smeared with bloody hand-prints drapes over a chair, a sword cutting across the composition from beneath it.

Meanwhile, the shadow of a man leans towards the frightened subject as the latter averts his gaze.

The narrative isn’t perfectly clear. Perhaps the unseen man is the child’s father, injured in the titular duel? Perhaps, instead, he’s some third party, come to explain the fatal result to a now fatherless son?

In any case, the result is a strikingly cinematic painting that would find itself perfectly at home on the cover of a Dashiell Hammett novel.

(via littlepennydreadful)

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Sunday, 19th October

Lindi Ortega, “Hard as This” (live)

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Sunday, 19th October

Princess Louise later Duchess of Argyll, fourth daughter of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, 1862.

(Source: teatimeatwinterpalace, via under-the-gaslight)

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Sunday, 19th October